1.3.4 Rococo B (1759-1799)

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QUICK LINKS:
Madame de Pompadour, Boucher
Apollo Destroying…, Wilson
Diana and Cupid, Batoni
David Garrick, Kauffman
George Clive, Reynolds
Gondolas Lagoon, Guardi
Spoiled Child, Greuze
Denis Diderot, Loo
The Swing, Fragonard
Denis Diderot, Fragonard
Inspiration, Fragonard
The Blue Boy, Gainsborough
The Meeting, Fragonard
Shipwreck…, Vernet
The Bard, Jones
Charles III Dining… Alcázar
The Lock, Fragonard
Mrs Mary Graham, Gainsborough
Marie Antoinette, Le Brun
Lady in Blue, Gainsborough
Virgin of Belen, Campeche y Jordán
The Ladies Waldegrave, Reynolds
Sir Charles Gould, Gainsborough
Julie Lebrun, Le Brun

[1340-63]

The top image is the Portrait of Madame de Pompadour from 1756. It is an oil on canvas painting by François Boucher, now in the Alte Pinakothek, Munich, Germany

The lower image is a 1759 painting, the last of a series of seven portraits by the artist of Madame de Pompadour. It was first exhibited at the Château de Versailles before passing to the subject’s brother. It is on show at the Wallace Collection in London.



Image source: Wikimedia commons
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Madame de Pompadour, Portraits1756 and 1759Oil/CanvasPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Boucher, François1703-1770, aged 67French painterRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms):[1340-40]

Alte Pinakothek, Munich, Germany / Wallace Collection, London UK91 x 68


Image source: Wikimedia commons
Wilson made many drawings in Rome and Naples between 1750 and 1757 that later served as backgrounds for his mythological and history paintings. The subject is taken from the Roman poet Ovid’s popular Metamorphoses. Niobe boasted unduly of her parentage, marriage, and fourteen children.

The offended goddess Latona sent her own son and daughter, Apollo and Diana, to punish Niobe by slaying her children. Apollo, with Diana behind him, is shooting the children with arrows from the cloud at the left. Wilson, typically, conveys the drama through the landscape, rather than through the figures.
[Source: collections.mfa.org]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Apollo Destroying the Children of Niobe 1760Oil/CanvasHistory Painting
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Wilson, Richard1714-1782, aged 67English painterRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-41]

Private Collection58 x74  
The painting was executed for Sir Humphrey Morice, son of a wealthy merchant and director of the Bank of England. Morice was a great animal lover and commissioned from Batoni a portrait of himself reclining in the Roman countryside after the hunt as a pendant to this canvas.

It shows the goddess of the hunt withholding the bow from Cupid. Although full of extraordinary warmth and feeling, the figure of Diana is based on a celebrated ancient statue of the sleeping Ariadne in the Vatican.

The painting may have been conceived as Batoni’s response to his rival, Anton Raphael Mengs, who championed the Neoclassical style.
[Source: metmuseum.org]

Image source: Wikimedia commons
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Diana and Cupid1761Oil/CanvasHistory Painting
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Batoni, Pompeo1708-1787Italian painter RomeRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-42]

Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY USA125 x 173  

Image source: Wikimedia commons
David Garrick was an English actor, playwright, theatre manager and producer who had a profound influence on theatrical practice in the 18th c.

This portrait was painted in Naples in the same year as the Kauffman portrait of Brownlow, 9th Earl of Exeter standing before Vesuvius. The Earl was one of the principal patrons of the gifted young Swiss born artist.
[Source: collections.burghley.co.uk]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
David Garrick, Portrait of 1764Oil/CanvasPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Kauffman, Angelica1741-1807, aged 66Swiss painterRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-43]

Burghley House, Peterborough, Stamford PE9 3JY UK84 x 69  
Prosperity permeates this group portrait by Reynolds. Lord George Clive was cousin of Robert Clive, founder of the empire of British India, and made his fortune at that land. Most beautifully painted is the centrally placed Indian nurse, who, kneeling, supports the little girl in Indian courtly attire.

Clearly the painter found the Indian’s depiction his greatest pleasure.
[Source: wga.hu]

Image source:Wikimedia commons
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
George Clive and his family with an Indian maid1765Oil/CanvasPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Reynolds, Joshua1723-1792, aged 69English painterRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-44]

Gemäldegalerie, Berlin Germany140 x 171  

Image source: Wikimedia commons
In a suspended, muffled atmosphere, where grey and blue are the predominant tones, some gondolas are moving through the calm waters of the lagoon, while in the distance, in the rosy light, we see the Venetian estuary.

Water and sky seem to merge, separated only by the line of buildings, walls and bell towers on the horizon. It is maybe the isle of Murano, here represented in a view wholly unusual in the Venetian painter’s repertory.
Some scholars have assumed that the work is the fragment of a larger painting.

They all agree in seeing this picture as foreshadowing the later development of landscape painting in the nineteenth century.
[Source: artsandculture.google.com]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Gondolas on the Lagoon (Grey Lagoon)1765Oil/CanvasLandscape
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Guardi, Francesco1712-1793, aged 81Italian painter VeniceRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-45]

Museo Poldi Pezzoli, Via Alessandro Manzoni, 12, 20121 Milano MI, Italy31 x 42  
Jean-Baptiste Greuze was a French genre and portrait painter who initiated a mid-18th-century vogue for sentimental and moralizing anecdotes in paintings.

Although Greuze’s attention at this time was fixed on a less-pretentious type of genre painting in which the influence of 17th-century Dutch masters is apparent, the favorable attention he received turned his head and established the lines of his future career.
 
In 1755 Greuze left for Italy but remained impervious to the influence of Italian painting. In 1759 he became acquainted with Denis Diderot, who encouraged his inclination toward melodramatic genre, and throughout the 1760s Greuze reached new heights of popular acclaim.

Throughout the 1770s Greuze was kept busy painting moralizing pictures, but by the 1780s his work had gone out of fashion and his income was precarious. By 1785 his once-considerable talent was exhausted. The reaction against his sentimental genre paintings resulted in critical neglect of his drawings and portraits, in which Greuze’s superb technical gifts are displayed with great integrity.

This painting is on show at the Hermitage, St Petersburg Russia.
[Source: flickr.com]

Image source: Wikimedia commons
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Spoiled Child, Thec17650Portrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Greuze, Jean-Baptiste1725-1805, aged 79French painter ParisRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-46]

State Hermitage Museum, Palace Square, 2, St Petersburg, Russia, 19000267 x 56  


Image source: Wikimedia commons
Wigs played an important role in 17th-century portraits. The exact origin of this accessory is not clean, but they were certainly widespread in distinguished circles by 1620-30. Wigs lent faces – and therefore all portraits – a similar impact because of a similar framework of ringlets and curls.

Whether bald or not, people choose the colour of their hair according to the attire to be worn and the event to be attended. Louis XIV and all French princes were highly attentive to such points.
Bare-headed portraits, like van

Loo’s depiction of Diderot, were the stuff of intellectuals and free-thinkers who asserted their independence and flaunted their character.
[Source: wga.hu]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Denis Diderot, Portrait of1767Oil/CanvasPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Loo, Louis-Michel van1707-1771, aged 64French painterRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-47]

Musée du Louvre, Paris France81 x 65  
The Swing, aka Les hasards heureux de l’escarpolette is Fragonard’s iconic painting, and one of the most emblematic images of 18th c French art.

A young woman wearing a lovely pink silk frock is tantalisingly positioned mid-air on a swing between her elderly husband on the right and her young lover on the left. The force of the swing caused one of her slippers to fly off, resulting in a privileged view for her lover whose delight is suggested by the symbolic offer of his hat.
[Source: wallacecollection.org]

Image source: Wikimedia commons
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Swing, The1767Oil/CanvasPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Fragonard, Jean-Honoré1732-1806, aged 74French painter ParisRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-48]

Wallace Collection, London UK81 x 64  

Image source: Wikimedia commons
At the time this portrait was painted, Denis Diderot was one of the most famous literati in Paris. As the editor and publisher of the Encyclopédie, and author of many articles, novels and pieces of art criticism, he had great reputation. From aristocratic Rococo culture to the bourgeois ethic of virtue, his books and articles accompanied the whole of French art production under the ancien regime.

Fragonard’s portrait of Diderot is part of his series of figures des fantaisies, which was being built up at this time and depicts people in particularly inspired moments. Diderot himself had, on the occasion of another portrait, demanded the ‘grace of action’. He wanted an action appropriate to the activity of the sitter, one which characterized him. The commandment here was truth and naturalness of presentation. The action and pose were to be demonstrated with natural gestures. The ideal, for Diderot, was solitude in an unobserved moment, and the portrait was to simulate this.

And as an unobserved genius in a state of inspired thought-production is also how Fragonard depicts him. This is a familiar enough genre, but Fragonard stages the enthusiasm of literary ideas with his impulsive painting technique and this combines the interest of the sitter with that of the beholder, a central concept in Diderot’s theory of art.
[Source; wga.hu]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Denis Diderot1769Oil/CanvasPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Fragonard, Jean-Honoré1732-1806, aged 74French painter ParisRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-49]

Musée du Louvre, Paris France82 x 65  
Inspiration (Self Portrait) is so different from many of Fragonard’s other paintings in that it is more warm, wistful, and frothy than his other portraits and was produced during the artist’s early years.

Fragonard’s intent here is not only to represent himself on canvas, but also to depict the moment when an artist receives inspiration from a subject. By leaving the subject unknown, the painting becomes a source of inspiration itself, in either a common or divine sense.

The artist is caught mid-pose, his actions frozen, his hand with brush in tow, ready for the next action that he will draw from this unseen inspiration.
[Source: artble.com]

Image source: Wikimedia commons
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Inspiration (Self Portrait)1769Pen/InkPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Fragonard, Jean-Honoré1732-1806, aged 74French painter ParisRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-50]

Private Collection/Met Museum23 x 35  

Image source: huntington.org
Gainsborough’s iconic painting first appeared in public in the Royal Academy exhibition of 1770 as A Portrait of a Young Gentleman, where it received high acclaim. By 1798 it was being called The Blue Boy, a nickname that stuck.

Huntington purchased The Blue Boy in 1921 for $728,000, the highest price ever paid for a painting at the time. By bringing a British treasure to the United States, Huntington imbued an already well-known image with even greater notoriety on both sides of the Atlantic. 

But beyond its cultural significance, the painting is considered a masterpiece of artistic virtuosity.Gainsborough’s command of colour and mastery of brushwork are on full display in the painting.
[Source: huntington.org]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Blue Boy, The: Jonathan Buttall1770OilPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Gainsborough, Thomas1727-1788, aged 60English painterRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-51]

Huntington Library and Gallery, 1151 Oxford Rd, San Marino, CA 91108, USA178 x 122  
The history of these paintings – one of the most powerful evocations of love in the history of art – is linked with the career of the Comtesse du Barry, the last mistress of Louis XV.

For a pleasure pavilion she commissioned from the architect Claude-Nicolas Ledoux in 1771, the countess ordered from Fragonard four canvases depicting ‘the four ages of love’. The series advances from a flirtatious proposal (a young man offers a girl a rose), to a furtive meeting (the lover scales the wall of a garden), to consummation or marriage (the girl crowns her lover with roses), to the calm enjoyment of a happy union (the reading of love letters).

Yet, for all their beauty and passion, Madame du Barry soon returned the canvases to the artist and ordered replacements from another. Were the resemblances between the red-coated lover and Louis XV potentially embarrassing?

Fragonard was left holding on to his creations for another twenty years. Then, adding seven more canvases, he installed the series in a cousin’s villa in southern France.

They passed through the collection of J. P. Morgan, where they were displayed in his London house. They were acquired by Frick in 1915 and installed in a room specially designed for them.
[Source: artsandculture.google.com]

Image source: Wikimedia commons
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Progress of Love: The Meeting (Les Progrès de l’amour : Le rendez-vous)1771-3Oil/CanvasLandscape
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Fragonard, Jean-Honoré1732-1806, aged 74French painter ParisRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-52]

The Frick Collection, New York USA318 x 244  

Image source: Wikimedia commons
This is one of a pair of seascapes, originally commissioned on behalf of the King of Poland, that the British officer and East India Company official Lord Clive (known as Clive of India) bought from Vernet in 1773.

Originally known as Tempête (Storm), it depicts a rocky shoreline buffeted by a violent sea storm. Two ships roll in the giant swell, sails tied down or tattered by the turbulent winds and lashing rain, while a third ship lies shattered against the rocks.

Figures carry salvaged goods up the shore, while an unconscious woman is laid out on a rock, her friends overwhelmed with despair.

The extreme, turbulent elements depicted here contrast with the tranquil atmosphere of its pair, Calme, reflecting ideas fashionable at the time about the beautiful and sublime in nature and art. They are the only great pair of marine views by Vernet in a British public collection.
[Source: nationalgallery.org.uk]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Shipwreck in Stormy Seas, A1772Oil/CanvasLandscape
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Vernet, Claude-Joseph1714-1789, aged 75French painterRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-53]

National Gallery, London UK114 x 163  
Poised on the edge of cliff clutching a harp, the last surviving bard places a curse on the English invaders before leaping to his death.

This dramatic history painting has become iconic for Wales. Based on Thomas Gray’s poem The Bard, it recounts the tale of Edward I’s legendary massacre of the Welsh bards.

Bards were highly regarded in Welsh society at that time, and were thought to be descendants of the Celtic druids. Jones makes this connection by giving his Bard druidic features – a long white beard and hooded robe.

The stone circle in the background, based on Stonehenge, emphasizes the antiquity of the druid. 

This is one of Jones’ early paintings in the grand manner, where the landscape is used as a background setting for a scene from history, literature or mythology. Jones regarded it as ‘one of the best I ever painted’.
[Source: museum.wales]

Image source: Wikimedia commons
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Bard, The1774Oil/CanvasHistory Painting
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Jones, Thomas1742-1803, aged 61English painterRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-54]

National Museum Cardiff, Cardiff CF10 3NP UK115 x 168  

Image source: wga.hu
Depictions of a royal person at table are infrequent, but at the court of Charles III, the king’s lunch followed a strict ceremony described by numerous foreign visitors of his time. Paret invites us to attend this daily ritual at the Royal Palace in Madrid.

Spain’s King Charles III sits at the table in presence of his ministers, ambassadors, servants and his favorite hunting dogs. Paret captures the moment when he is about to drink from a goblet offered by a servant on bended knee.

The walls are sumptuously decorated with striking tapestries whose mythological subjects have been identified. They touch on subjects such as patriotism, embodied by Iphigenia’s sacrifice, which legitimized her father Agamemnon’s attack on Troy; love, suggested by Mercury and Herse’s shared passion; hunting, in the form of its tutelary goddess, Diana; and military honor, reflected by the armor that Vulcan made for Venus’s son, Aeneas, future conqueror of Rome.

These scenes may have been chosen to reflect the ceremony taking place in front of them, or as allusions to the king’s intimate thoughts.
[Source: museodelprado.es]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Charles III Dining Before the Courtc1775Oil/PanelHistory Painting
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Alcázar, Luis Paret y1746-1799, aged 53Spanish painterRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-55]

Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid Spain50 x 64  
The Bolt (French: Le Verrou), also known as The Lock, is a 1777 Fragonard painting. It is one of the most famous paintings by the painter.

The common interpretation suggests that the scene depicts two lovers entwined in a bedroom, while the man is locking the door.
[Source: Wikimedia commons]

Image source: Wikimedia commons
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Lock, The (aka The Bolt; Le Verrou)1777Oil/CanvasPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Fragonard, Jean-Honoré1732-1806, aged 74French painter ParisRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-56]

Musée du Louvre, Paris France71 x 92  

Image source: Wikimedia commons
This is one of Gainsborough’s finest full-length portraits. The costume and accessories evoke the era of King Charles I and the opulent court portraits of Sir Anthony van Dyck.

The sitter was born the Honourable Mary Cathcart, daughter of 9th Lord Cathcart, who was Ambassador to Catherine the Great. She married the Perthshire landowner Thomas Graham in 1774, and they bought Lynedoch House near Methven, Perthshire in 1787.

The portrait was highly acclaimed when exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1777. Thomas Graham, devastated by his wife’s premature death in 1792, passed the painting to her sister. It was bequeathed to the National Galleries of Scotland by one of their descendants on condition that it never leaves the country.
[Source: nationalgalleries.org]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Mrs Mary Graham, Portrait of the Honourable1777Oil/CanvasPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Gainsborough, Thomas1727-1788, aged 60English painterRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-57]

Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, 75 Belford Rd, Edinburgh EH4 3DR237 x 154  
In 1777, Empress Maria Theresa of Austria wrote to her daughter Marie Antoinette asking for a portrait.

Vigée Le Brun received the commission, her first from the queen. She recalled that the queen ‘walked better than any other woman in France, holding her head very high with a majesty that singled her out in the midst of the entire court.’
[Source: metmuseum.org]

Image source: metmuseum.org
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Marie Antoinette in a Court Dress1778Oil/CanvasPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Le Brun, Élisabeth Louise Vigée1755 – 1842, aged 88French artistRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-58]

Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna Austria273 x 194  

Image source: Wikimedia commons
Gainsborough’s portrait of this unknown lady is rightly regarded as one of the most charming and excellent works in the Hermitage collection of English painting.

Although the artist did not in fact like painting portraits, preferring to work on landscapes, it is for his portraits that he was best loved and is best known today.

Here he created an image of great elegance and beauty, a painting dominated by a mood of romantic dreaminess. The light, mobile, melting brushstrokes convey the soft skin, the greyish-blue silk of the shawl, and the luxuriant feather of the headdress which surmounts the powdered wig.

Free, sketchy painting is combined with fine transitions of colour to create an effect something akin to pastel.

Gainsborough’s style was noted and much admired by contemporaries, and even his great rival, the President of the Royal Academy, Sir Joshua Reynolds, admitted his skill.
[Source: hermitagemuseum.org]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
A Lady in Blue, Portrait of1770sOil/CanvasPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Gainsborough, Thomas1727-1788, aged 60English painterRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-59]

State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg, Russia, 19001177 x 64  
José Campeche was born in San Juan de Puerto Rico in the quarter of Calle San Sebastian Cruz. He is known as the first Puerto Rican artist and founder of the Puerto Rican national school.

Belén is the Spanish for Bethlehem.
[Source: artsandculture.google.com]

Image source: Wikimedia commons
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Virgin of Belen, Nuestra senora de Belén/Virgen de Belénlate 18thOil/CopperHistory Painting
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Campeche, José y Jordán1751-1805, aged 57Puerto Rican artistRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-60]

Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC 20004, USA24 x 19  

Image source: Wikimedia commons
Reynolds was particularly skilled at choosing poses and actions which suggested a sitter’s character and which also created a strong composition.

Here, three sisters, the daughters of the 2nd Earl Waldegrave, are shown collaboratively working on a piece of needlework. The joint activity links the girls together.

On the left, the eldest, Lady Charlotte, holds a skein of silk, which the middle sister, Lady Elizabeth, winds onto a card. On the right, the youngest, Lady Anna, works a tambour frame, using a hook to make lace on a taut net.
[Source: nationalgalleries.org]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Ladies Waldegrave, The1780Oil/CanvasPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Reynolds, Joshua1723-1792, aged 69English painterRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-61]

Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, 75 Belford Rd, Edinburgh EH4 3DR144 x 168  
Portrait of Sir Charles Gould, full-length, in a brown coat and breeches and a white waistcoat, holding a tricorn in his right hand, his left hand on the hilt of a sword, in an architectural interior, 1782.
[Source: artnet.com]

Image courtesy of thomas-gainsborough.org
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Sir Charles Gould, Portrait of1782Oil/CanvasPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Gainsborough, Thomas1727-1788, aged 60English painterRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1340-62]

Unknown228 x 153  

Image source: metmuseum.org
Here, the artist’s daughter Julie represents Flora, the Roman goddess of flowers, to symbolize youthful beauty.

The flowing drapery was inspired by Greco-Roman attire. Vigée-Lebrun spent four years in Italy. She lived for a time in Naples, near the ancient Roman city of Pompeii, which fueled the imaginations of many artists during this period. The landscape here recalls the area’s mountainous coastline.

Vigée-Lebrun was one of the few women elected to the French Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture (1783). Patronized by Queen Marie-Antoinette throughout the 1780s, Vigée-Lebrun fled France following the Revolution of 1789. 

From Italy, she traveled to St. Petersburg, Russia, where this work was created. There, Julie met and married a man of whom her mother deeply disapproved, shattering their relationship. This is perhaps the last of many paintings she made of Julie.
[Source: mfastpete.org]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Julie Lebrun as Flora1799Oil/CanvasPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Le Brun, Élisabeth Louise Vigée1755 – 1842, aged 88French artistRococo
LOCATION:SIZE (cms):  
Museum of Fine Arts, 255 Beach Dr NE, St. Petersburg, FL 33701, USA130 x 98  

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