1.7.1.2 Pop Art B (1950s-1970s)

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QUICK LINKS:
Three Flags, Johns
False Start, Johns
Campbell’s Soup Cans, Warhol
Gold Marilyn Monroe, Warhol
200 One Dollar Bills, Warhol
Marilyn Diptych, Warhol
Double Elvis (Ferus Type), Warhol
Drowning Girl, Lichtenstein
Eight Elvises, Warhol
Green Car Crash, Warhol
Whaam!, Lichtenstein
Mustard Race Riot, Warhol
A Bigger Splash, Hockney

California Seascape, Hockney
Campbell’s Soup 1: Tomato, Warhol
Mr & Mrs Clarke and Percy, Hockney
Self-Portrait with Skull, Warhol
My Parents, Hockney
Berlin Junction, Serra
Michael Jackson and Bubbles, Koons
Nude with Joyous Painting, Lichtenstein
Floralis Genérica, Catalano
Woman Taking off Man’s Shirt in Five Stages, Opie

Pop Art was an art movement that emerged in the United Kingdom and the United States during the mid- to late-1950s.

The movement presented a challenge to traditions of fine art by including imagery from popular and mass culture, such as advertising, comic books and mundane mass-produced objects. One of its aims is to use images of popular (as opposed to elitist) culture in art, emphasising the banal or kitschy elements of any culture, most often through the use of irony.

It is also associated with the artists’ use of mechanical means of reproduction or rendering techniques. In pop art, material is sometimes visually removed from its known context, isolated, or combined with unrelated material.

[Source: Wikimedia commons]

[1712-10]

In 1954, Jasper Johns began painting what would become one of his signature emblems: the American flag.

As an iconic image–comparable to the targets, maps, and letters that he also has depicted–Johns realized that the flag was seen and not looked at, not examined.

The execution and composition of Three Flags elicit close inspection by the viewer. The painting draws attention to the process of its making through Johns’s use of encaustic, a mixture of pigment suspended in warm wax that congeals as each stroke is applied; the resulting accumulation of discrete marks creates a sensuous, almost sculptural surface.

The work’s structural arrangement adds to its complexity. The trio of flags—each successively diminished in scale by about twenty-five percent—projects outward, contradicting classical perspective, in which objects appear to recede from the viewer’s vantage point. By shifting the visual emphasis from the flag’s emblematic meaning to the geometric patterns and variegated texture of the picture surface and the canvas structure, Johns explores the boundary between abstraction and representation.

As he remarked, this painting allowed him to go beyond the limits of the flag, and to have different canvas space.  
[Source: whitney.org]

Image source: Wikimedia commons
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Three Flags1958EncausticAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Johns, Jasper 1930 –American painterPop Art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-11]

Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort St, New York, NY 10014, USA90 x 110  

Image source: moma.org
In this work Johns plays with perceptual cues, posing the linguistic against the visual by mismatching the words for colours with the inks they are printed in—for example, writing the word ‘yellow’ in blue ink.

Johns printed a second composition in grays and black using the same stones, a strategy that became one of his common practices in printmaking.
[Source: moma.org]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
False Start1959LithoAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Johns, Jasper 1930 –American painterPop Art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-12]

MOMA, Museum of Modern Art, 1 W 53rd St, New York, NY 10019, USA45 x 35  
Andy Warhol famously appropriated familiar images from consumer culture and mass media, in this work, the widely consumed canned soup made by the Campbell’s Soup Company.

When he first exhibited Campbell’s Soup Cans in 1962, the canvases were displayed together on shelves, like products in a grocery aisle.

Though Campbell’s Soup Cans resembles the mass-produced, printed advertisements by which Warhol was inspired, its canvases are hand-painted, and the fleur de lys pattern ringing each can’s bottom edge is hand-stamped. Warhol mimicked the repetition and uniformity of advertising by carefully reproducing the same image across each individual canvas. He varied only the label on the front of each can, distinguishing them by their variety. 

Warhol said of Campbell’s soup, I used to drink it. I used to have the same lunch every day, for 20 years, I guess, the same thing over and over again.

Warhol turned to the photo-silkscreen process shortly after completing these works, it would become his signature medium. I don’t think art should be only for the select few, he claimed, I think it should be for the mass of the American people.
[Source: moma.org]

Image source: Wikimedia commons
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Campbell’s Soup Cans1961-2Plymr/CnvStill Life
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Warhol, Andy1928 – 1987, aged 58American artistPop Art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-13]

MOMA, Museum of Modern Art, 11 W 53rd St, New York, NY 10019, USA51 x 41  

Image source: moma.org
Marilyn Monroe was a legend when she committed suicide in August of 1962, but in retrospect her life seems a gradual martyrdom to the media and to her public.

After her death, Warhol based many works on the same photograph of her, a publicity still for the 1953 movie Niagara.

He would paint the canvas with a single color – turquoise, green, blue, lemon yellow – then silkscreen Monroe’s face on top, sometimes alone, sometimes doubled, sometimes multiplied in a grid.

As the surround for a face, the golden field in Gold Marilyn Monroe (the only one of Warhol’s Marilyns to use this color) recalls the religious icons of Christian art history—a resonance, however, that the work suffuses with a morbid allure.
[Source: moma.org]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Gold Marilyn Monroe1962Slkscrn inkPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Warhol, Andy1928 – 1987, aged 58American artistPop Art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-14]

MOMA, Museum of Modern Art, 1 W 53rd St, New York, NY 10019, USA211 x 145  

Image source: sothebys.com
Aptly named 200 One Dollar Bills, depicts a vast, 20-by-10 grid of $1 bills. The painting belongs to Warhol’s famous Dollar Bill series, which marks the first instance of Warhol’s use of the silk-screening method. At this early stage in his experimentation with the technique, Warhol had not yet progressed to the point where he was transferring images photographically to the screens – the images of currency are based on the artist’s drawings and thus provide a glimpse of Warhol’s hand as a draughtsman.

Prouty says that within the Dollar Bill series, Warhol only created ten paintings in this repetitive format – that depicted more than two bills on a single canvas. 200 One Dollar Bills is one of the two largest of those ten; the other, entitled 192 One Dollar Bills, belongs to the Marx Collection and hangs in a Berlin museum.
[Source: sothebys.com]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
200 One Dollar Bills19620Genre Painting
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Warhol, Andy1928 – 1987, aged 58American artistPop Art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-15]

Private collection204 x 234  

Image source: tate.org.uk
Warhol made his first paintings of Marilyn Monroe soon after the actor died of a drug overdose in 1962.

The use of two contrasting canvases for Marilyn Diptych illustrates the contrast between the public life of the star, who at the time was one of the most famous women alive, and her private self. This was not necessarily Warhol’s intention.

He created this work when the art collectors Burton and Emily Tremaine visited Warhol’s home. They suggested that two canvases he had already made be presented as a diptych, to which Warhol responded, gee whiz yes.
[Source: tate.org.uk]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Marilyn Diptych1962AcrylcPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Warhol, Andy1928 – 1987, aged 58American artistPop Art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-16]

Tate Galleries, Millbank, Westminster, London SW1P 4RG UK205 x 290  
A gleaming masterpiece that stands among the most iconic images of 20th century art, Andy Warhol’s Double Elvis [Ferus Type] faces us with visionary force. Elvis Presley, dressed as a gunslinger in a publicity shot for the 1960 Western movie Flaming Star, is doubled in black silkscreen upon a shimmering silver ground.

He looms almost life-size, as if caught in a full-length mirror. The painting is at once striking, its six-foot star recognisable in a flash, and loaded with ambiguity. Warhol distills his famed serial production method into a succinct twinned image that reflects the overlapping nuances of celebrity, filmmaking, desire and performance in sixties America.

Cropped slightly at the head, the two Elvises intersect at the knees, aligned in such a way that the left-hand figure appears to be holding both pistols. With our attention drawn to his pose and finely-tuned outfit, Presley as cowboy is the image of idealized American manhood wryly exposed as a costumed interloper.

United with the silver canvas, he takes his place in a flat, empty surface that, for Warhol, functions as a looking glass. With subtle mastery, Warhol mirrors the cultural world of his time, both glorifying and destabilizing its glamorous, seductive fictions.
[Source: christies.com]

Image source: christies.com
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Double Elvis [Ferus Type]19630Portrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Warhol, Andy1928 – 1987, aged 58American artistPop Art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-17]

MOMA, Museum of Modern Art, 1 W 53rd St, New York, NY 10019, USA208 x 134  

Image source: Wikimedia commons
Roy Lichtenstein grounded his inventive career in imitation, beginning by appropriating images from advertisements and comic books in the early 1960s.

The source for his painting, Drowning Girl, is “Run for Love!,” the melodramatic lead story of Secret Love #83, a DC Comics comic book from 1962.

In the original illustration, the drowning girl’s boyfriend appears in the background, clinging to a capsized boat. Lichtenstein dramatically cropped the image, removing the boat and the boyfriend so that the girl appears alone and centered, her head circled by a vortex of water.

Explaining the appeal of comic books, Lichtenstein said, I was very excited about, and interested in, the highly emotional content yet detached, impersonal handling of love, hate, war, etc. in these cartoon images.

To make his painting appear mechanically produced, Lichtenstein painstakingly imitated the look of commercially printed images. Working by hand, he first copied the source image, altering its composition as he liked. He then projected and traced his sketch onto a canvas, outlining its figures and forms in black and filling in the images with primary colors or with patterns of repeating dots that replicated the Ben-Day dots commonly used in mass-printing processes.
[Source: moma.org]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Drowning Girl1963Oil/CanvasPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Lichtenstein, Roy1923 – 1997, aged 71American painterPop art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-18]

MOMA, Museum of Modern Art, 1 W 53rd St, New York, NY 10019, USA172 x 170  
Eight Elvises is a 1963 silkscreen painting by American pop artist Andy Warhol of Elvis Presley.

Eight Elvises, as its title indicates, is composed of eight identical, overlapping images of Elvis Presley in cowboy attire, silkscreened over a silver background.
[Source: Wikimedia commons]


Image source: Wikimedia commons
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Eight Elvises1963Slkscrn inkPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Warhol, Andy 1928 – 1987, aged 58American artistPop Art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-19]

Private collection200 x 370  

Image source: Wikimedia commons
The Car Crash paintings that Warhol made between late 1962 and early 1964, form the most varied and extensive group of pictures in his seminal series of Death and Disaster paintings.

Drawing on six different documentary source photographs each outlining six separate, horrific and increasingly bizarre fatal accidents, Warhol’s Car Crashes remain among the most powerful, challenging and provocative paintings made by any artist in the Post-War era.
[Source: christies.com]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Green Car Crash (Green Burning Car I)1963PaintGenre painting
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Warhol, Andy1928 – 1987, aged 58American artistPop Art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-20]

Private collection229 x 203  

Image source: tate.org.uk
 Whaam! 1963 is a large, two-canvas painting by the American pop artist Roy Lichtenstein that takes its composition from a comic book strip. The left-hand canvas features an American fighter plane firing a missile into the right-hand canvas and hitting an approaching enemy plane.

The painting is rendered in the formal tradition of machine-printed comic strips – thick black lines enclosing areas of primary colour and lettering, with uniform areas of Ben-Day dots, purple for the shading on the main fighter plane and blue for the background of the sky.

The work’s composition is taken from a panel drawn by Irv Novick which appeared in issue number 89 of All-American Men of War, published by DC Comics in February 1962.
[Source; tate.org.uk]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Whaam!1963Acry/Oil/CnvAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Lichtenstein, Roy1923 – 1997, aged 71American painterPop Art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-21]

Tate Galleries, Millbank, Westminster, London SW1P 4RG UK173 x 406  
The tumultuous history of the fight for civil rights had been laid long before the appearance of Charles Moore’s 1963 photographs in Life magazine, and their appropriation by Andy Warhol for his painting Mustard Race Riot produced in the same year.

The Mustard Race Riot depicts the grainy images of police brutality to chaotic excess, recalling, perhaps, a printing press that has run amok.
[Source: Christies.com]

Image source: artnet.com
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Mustard Race Riot1964AcrylcGenre painting
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Warhol, Andy1928 – 1987, aged 58American artistPop Art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-22]

Gagosian Gallery, New York USA150 x 170  

Image source: tate.org.uk
A Bigger Splash was painted between April and June 1967 when Hockney was teaching at the University of California at Berkeley. The image is derived in part from a photograph Hockney discovered in a book on the subject of building swimming pools.

The background is taken from a drawing he had made of Californian buildings.

A Bigger Splash is the largest and most striking of three ‘splash’ paintings. The Splash (private collection) and A Little Splash (private collection) were both completed in 1966. They share compositional characteristics with the later version.

All represent a view over a swimming pool towards a section of low-slung, 1960s modernist architecture in the background. A diving board juts out of the margin into the paintings’ foreground, beneath which the splash is represented by areas of lighter blue combined with fine white lines on the monotone turquoise water. The positioning of the diving board – coming at a diagonal out of the corner – gives perspective as well as cutting across the predominant horizontals.
[Source: tate.org.uk]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Bigger Splash, A1967Acry/CnvGenre Painting
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Hockney, David1937 –English painterPop Art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-23]

Private Collection2425 x 2439  
On Hockney’s return to California from England in 1968 he worked on three big pictures.

One of these was California Seascape. The view is through the window of the home of fellow artist Dick Smith, who lived in Corona del Mar on the Pacific coast. The picture was Smith’s suggestion.

The other two were a double portrait, Christopher Isherwood and Don Bachardy and American Collectors.

Hockney was pleased with the unusual ‘picture within a picture’’ composition in which interior is of equal importance to the exterior.

The finished painting is in a slick, realist style in comparison with this very fluid watercolour.
[Source: artscouncilcollection.org]

Image source: present5.com
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
California Seascape1968WtrC/PprLandscape
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Hockney, David1937 –English painterPop Art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-24]

Arts Council Collection, London58 x 77  

Image source: kingandmcgaw.com
The first Campbell’s Soup Can paintings were shown at Ferus Gallery in Los Angeles in 1962. The exhibition of 32 paintings met with such ridicule and derision that a neighboring gallery put actual soup cans in its window and labeled them the real thing, sold for twenty-nine cents.

The original Soup Can paintings were meant to depict objects so common and everyday that no one would even notice them, but what Warhol ended up making were infamous images with which he would become synonymous.

The banality of hundreds of soup cans on a grocer’s shelf is magnified in these silkscreens, which are blown up larger than life. Silver and gold metallic inks embellish the straight-on portrayals of popular flavors, such as Pepper Pot, Black Bean and Tomato.

The images’ clean, crisp lines are indicative of the silkscreen method, and the use of this mass-reproduction process parallels the mass marketing, production and consumption of the food items themselves.
[Source: nortonsimon.org]

TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Campbell’s Soup 1: Tomato1968ScrnpntStill life
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Warhol, Andy 1928 – 1987, aged 58American artistPop Art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-25]

Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY USA89 x 59  

This is one of a series of large double portraits which Hockney began in 1968. He had painted imaginary couples in earlier paintings.

In the later paintings, the subjects are real couples who were Hockney’s friends. They are portrayed in their home environment in a style which is both realistic and highly simplified. Hockney worked from photographs and life observation, making drawings to resolve composition.

Usually one character looks at the other, who looks out of the painting at the viewer, thus creating a cyclical movement of looking. Mr and Mrs Clark and Percy is unusual in that both subjects, Mr and Mrs Clark, look out at the artist and viewer from either side of a large open window which is in the centre of the painting.
[Source: tate.org.uk]

Image source: tate.org.uk
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Mr and Mrs Clarke and Percy1971Acry/CnvPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Hockney, David1937 –English painterPop Art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-32]

Tate Galleries, Millbank, Westminster, London SW1P 4RG UK213 x 305  
Emulating earlier works suggesting mortality, Andy Warhol’s created this Polaroid Polarcolor Self-Portrait with Skull in 1977. Warhol would select from among his photographs (often Polaroids), then have these enlarged onto silk screens. He would get his ‘Factory’ assistants to lay the screens over canvases and apply one or two colours with a squeegee.
(Source: artsy.net)

Image source: artsy.net
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Self-Portrait with Skull1977Polaroid PolacolorPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Warhol, Andy 1928 – 1987, aged 58American artistPop Art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-26]

National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia11 x 9  
Image source: tate.org.ukHockney completed this work after two failed attempts at painting his parents, Kenneth and Laura Hockney. They were frustrated when Hockney gave up on previous versions, having spent hours posing for him.

However, speaking about their reaction to My Parents, Hockney’s sister Margaret said, Mum and Dad were very proud of it, and felt all the sittings had been worthwhile.

Kenneth and Laura’s poses may reflect their personalities. Laura is gazing directly at the viewer. Kenneth, known for fidgeting during sittings, is shown reading, as though he has forgotten he is being observed.
[Source: tate.org.uk]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
My Parents1977Oil/CanvasPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Hockney, David1937 –English painterPop Art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-27]

Tate Galleries, Millbank, Westminster, London SW1P 4RG UK1829 X 1829  
Serra’s Berlin Junction consists of two large rusting metal sheets, that sit within Potsdamer Platz’s Kulturforum.

Beside it is a plaque identifying that here, Tiergartenstrasse 4 (aka T4), was where the Nazi’s planned and ran their euthanasia programme in WWII.

It ran from 1939-1945, targeting the disabled and mentally ill, some 70,000 were murdered by the programme. Though this could be four times higher when the whole of the German Reich is considered.

However Serra’s commemorative steel structure is dedicated to the later mass murders of the Holocaust. This disregard for the earlier mass murders caused local controversy until a new plaque and then an official memorial linked the two ‘events’.
[Source: translating-berlin.com]

Image source: Wikmedia commons
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Berlin Junction1987Curved steel platesSculpture
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Serra, Richard1938 – American artist 
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-28]

Potsdamer Platz’s Kulturforum Berlin, Germany  

Image source: bbc.co.uk
 Michael Jackson and Bubbles is a porcelain sculpture by the American artist Jeff Koons. It was created in 1988 within the framework of his Banality series.

Bubbles was Jackson’s domestic animal who was bought by the artist from a Texas research facility in 1983. It has been claimed by the media that he was Jackson’s best and faithful friend who even joined the singer on his world tours and helped in the household.

Jeff Koons used a press photo of Jackson and Bubbles as a template for his sculpture. It is almost identical to the artist’s work except for a slight variation of the posture. Koons changed Jackson’s direction of view and thus adjusted the composition to the requirements of a sculptural work which has to take into account many different viewing angles.
[Source: Wikimedia commons]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Michael Jackson and Bubbles1988PorcelainSculpture
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Koons, Jeff1956 – American artistPop Art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-29]

Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art, Strandpromenaden 2, 0252 Oslo, Norway110 x 179 x 83  
Clad in only a pale blue headband, the shapely contours of the heroine in Roy Lichtenstein’s masterful late painting Nude with Joyous Painting is a classic American beauty—a sumptuous marriage of soft, supple flesh and steamy pulp fiction pin-up.

Painted in 1994, it is an iconic, tour-de-force of the last series of great nudes that the artist began in 1993 and continued until his death in 1997.

The Nudes mark his majestic return to the comic-book heroines that propelled him to fame in the early 1960s and together, they rank among his most significant bodies of work.

Culled from his prodigious archive of vintage comics, the Nudes marry Lichtenstein’s Pop Art sensibility with the most storied subject in the history of Western art—the female nude.
[Source: christies.com]

Image source: christies.com
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Nude with Joyous Painting1994Oil/Magna/CnvAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Lichtenstein, Roy1923 – 1997, aged 71American painterPop Art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-30]

Private Collection178 x 137  

Image source: Wikimedia commons
Floralis Genérica is a sculpture made of steel and aluminum located in Plaza de las Naciones Unidas, Avenida Figueroa Alcorta, Buenos Aires, a gift to the city by the Argentine architect Eduardo Catalano.

One of the characteristics of the flower is an electrical system that automatically opens and closes the petals depending on the time of the day. At night the flower closes, emanating a red glow from inside, and reopens the following morning. This mechanism also closes the flower if strong winds blow.

Catalano once said that the flower is a synthesis of all the flowers and, at the same time, a hope reborn every day at opening. It was created in 2002.

The sculpture is located in the centre of a park of four acres of wooded boundaries, surrounded by paths that get closer and provide different perspectives of the monument, and placed above a reflecting pool, which apart from fulfilling its aesthetic function, protects it. It weighs eighteen tons and is 23 meters high.
[Source: Wikimedia commons]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Floralis Genérica2002Almn/StlSculpture
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Catalano, Eduardo1917 – 2010, aged 92Argentine architectPop Art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1712-31]

Plaza de las Naciones Unidas, Buenos Aires, Argentina23m high  
Opie is a sculptor and digital artist associated with the New British Sculpture movement, and best known for portraits that reduce subjects to essential lines and color planes.

In his early work, Opie made steel sculptures of domestic appliances, architectural structures and abstract, geometrical shapes. More recently, he has focused on digital media such as LED projections and graphic art. His work draws on classical portraiture, Japanese woodblock prints and Pop Art aesthetics, particularly the work of Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein.
[Source: artnet.com]

Image source: artnet.com
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Woman Taking off Man’s Shirt in Five Stages 2004ScrnPrntGenre Painting
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Opie, Julian1958 –British artistPop Art
LOCATION:SIZE (cms):  
Private Collection48 x 88  

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