1.5.4.4 Fauvism (1905-1910)

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QUICK LINKS:
The Bar Counter, de Vlaminick
Luxury, Calm and Desire, Matisse
Woman with a Hat, Matisse
Lady in a Chemise, Derain

La Danse, Matisse
La Danse II, Matisse
Sonia de Klamery, Anglada-Camarasa
The Piano Lesson, Matisse

Fauvism is the style of les Fauves, French for ‘the wild beasts’, a group of early 20th-century modern artists whose works emphasised painterly qualities and strong colour over the representational or realistic values retained by Impressionism.

While Fauvism as a style began around 1904 and continued beyond 1910, the movement as such lasted only a few years, 1905–1908, and had three exhibitions.The leaders of the movement were André Derain and Henri Matisse.

[Source: Wikimedia commons]

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An important figure in early 20th century French painting, the artist Maurice de Vlaminck was one of the founding members of the Fauvism movement, along with Henri Matisse and Andre Derain. Born in Paris, Vlaminck was largely self-taught, indeed he boasted that he had never set foot inside the Louvre. while his friendship with Derain in 1900 was crucial to his artist development and career.

In 1900, Vlaminck met Matisse, a crucial contributor to the formation of the Fauves, although a fiercely competitive nature later led Vlaminck to repeatedly deny Matisse’s contribution to the movement. In 1905 Vlaminck participated, along with Derain and Matisse, at the celebrated exhibition at the Salon d’Automne, which caused such an outcry with art critics and public alike.
[Source: visual-arts-cork.com]

Image source: Wikimedia commons
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Bar Counter, The1900Oil/CanvasPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
de Vlaminck, Maurice1876 – 1958, aged 82French painterFauvism
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1544-11]

Musée Calvet, 65 Rue Joseph Vernet, 84000 Avignon, France30 x 21  

Image source: Wikimedia commons
Luxe, Calme et Volupté takes its name from the refrain of Charles Baudelaire’s poem, Invitation to a Voyage, in which a man invites his lover to travel with him to paradise. The painting shares the poem’s subject: escape to an imaginary, tranquil refuge.

In 1904, Henri Matisse participated in a joint show at the Salon d’Automne and in 1904 had his first solo exhibition at Ambroise Vollard’s gallery. In 1905 at the Salon des Independants he exhibited the painting Luxe, Calme et Volupté, which was promptly bought by Paul Signac.

Matisse had got to know Signac one summer in St. Tropez, and had read his book ‘From Eugene Delacroix to Neo Impressionism’ as early as 1898 or 1899 Signac’s method of analyzing colour appealed to Matisse, and he adopted it as a means of modeling light through colour.
[Source: henrimatisse.org]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Luxury, Calm and Desire (Luxe Calme et Volupte)1904Oil/CanvasAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Matisse, Henri1869-1954, age 95French painterFauvism
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1544-12]

Musée d’Orsay,  Rue de la Légion d’Honneur, 75007 Paris, France99 x 119  
Femme au chapeau marked a stylistic change from the regulated brushstrokes of Matisse’s earlier work to a more expressive individual style. His use of non-naturalistic colours and loose brushwork, which contributed to a sketchy or ‘unfinished’ quality, seemed shocking to the viewers of the day.

The artist’s wife, Amélie, posed for this half-length portrait. She is depicted in an elaborate outfit with classic attributes of the French bourgeoisie: a gloved arm holding a fan and an elaborate hat perched atop her head. Her costume’s vibrant hues are purely expressive, however; when asked about the hue of the dress Madame Matisse was actually wearing when she posed for the portrait, the artist allegedly replied, Black, of course.
[Source: henrimatisse.org]

Image source: Wikimedia commons
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Woman with a Hat1905Oil/CanvasPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Matisse, Henri1869-1954, age 95French painterFauvism
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1544-13]

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, 151 3rd St, San Francisco, CA 94103, USA81 x 60  

Image source: artsandculture.google.com
André Derain’s Woman in a Chemise has often been used as the eye-catching feature of publications, posters and in other contexts because it has such striking visual impact and is so easily recognisable, even if one doesn’t remember who the artist is.

I think it’s an amazingly virtuoso picture. Derain’s works with composition, colours and lines in a hugely sophisticated manner. If you look more closely at the female figure’s hand, it is completely deformed, but still it seems exactly right in the picture, giving it a sense of freshness and wildness. Note the flowing lines, too. The painting is very nonchalant in its execution, yet insanely confident at the same time. It is utterly compelling as a work of art, and at the same time it sends a strong signal about what French Modernism is, says chief curator and senior researcher Dorthe Aagesen.
[Source: artsandculture.google.com]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Lady in a Chemise1906OilPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Derain, André1880 – 1954, aged 74French painterFauvism
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1544-14]

SMK (Statens Museum for Kunst) Copenhagen, Denmark – Private Collection100 x 81  
In 1909 Matisse received an important commission. An extremely wealthy Russian industrialist named Sergei Shchukin asked Matisse for three large scale canvases to decorate the spiral staircase of his mansion, the Trubetskoy Palace, in Moscow.

The large and well loved painting, Dance I at MoMA is somewhat disingenously titled. Although it is full scale and in oil, Matisse did not consider it more than a preparatory sketch. Yet a comparison between the initial and final versions is instructive. Matisse borrowed the motif from the back of the 1905-06 painting Bonheur de Vivre, although he has removed one dancer.
[Source: henrimatisse.org]

Image source: Wikimedia commons
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Danse, La1910OilAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Matisse, Henri1869-1954, age 95French painterFauvism
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1544-15]

State Hermitage Museum, Palace Square, 2, St Petersburg, Russia, 190004260 x 391  

Image source: Wikimedia commons
The pair of panels known as The Dance and Music are amongst Matisse’s most important – and most famous – works of the period 1908 to 1913. They were commissioned in 1910 by one of the leading Russian collectors of French late 19th and early 20th-century art, Sergey Shchukin.

Until the Revolution of 1917, they hung on the staircase of his Moscow mansion. Both compositions belong to a group of works united by the theme of “the golden age” of humanity, and therefore the figures are not real people but imagined image-symbols. The sources of Matisse’s The Dance lie in folk dances, which even today preserve something of the ritual nature – albeit not always comprehended today – of pagan times.
[Source: hermitagemuseum.org]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Danse, La (II)1910OilAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Matisse, Henri1869-1954, age 95French painterFauvism
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1544-16]

State Hermitage Museum, Palace Square, 2, St Petersburg, Russia, 190005260 x 391  
From 1897 onwards, when he first went to Paris, Hermen Anglada Camarasa’s painting began to show marked influences of artists like Toulouse Lautrec, Gustav Klimt and Van Dongen.

But the real turning point in his style, so evident in Sonia de Klamery (echada), came in 1909, with the arrival in Paris of Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes, featuring Nijinski and Pavlova. The event was a social and artistic sensation that revolutionised both tastes and customs.

Anglada Camarasa was deeply moved by the sets and costumes of vibrant oranges, purples and greens, to the extent that from then on the pale shades in his female portraits would be replaced by brilliant multicolours.

Sonia de Klamery (echada) and other such pictures show the importance in the final appearance of Anglada Camarasa’s oils of a plastic concept based on the priority of colour, with thickly applied material dividing the pictorial space into linear rhythms and coloured fields.
{Source: museoreinasofia.es]

Image source: museoreinasofia.es
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Sonia de Klamery (Lying) [Sonia de Klamery (echada)]1913Oil/CanvasPortrait
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Anglada-Camarasa, Hermenegildo1871-1959, aged 78Spanish painter (Catalan)Fauvism
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1544-17]

Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía. Calle de Santa Isabel, 52, 28012 Madrid, Spain187 x 200  

Image source: moma.org
This highly abstract painting is important because of its relation to the Cubist grid developed by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, because of its biographical aspects, and especially due to its thoughtful iconography (symbolic content).

This large flat gray painting can be a bit confusing at first. Let’s begin with the boy in the lower right. He is the artist’s son, Pierre Matisse, who grows up to become a famous art dealer in New York in the 1940s. It’s worth remembering that 1916 was during world war one, the most devastating conflict Europe had yet known. When Henri painted this image, Pierre was actually mobilized. The painter did not know if his son would return. In a way then, this is a nostalgic image, Matisse has painted his son much younger then he actually was, perhaps recalling happier times.

Pierre sits at the piano well off to the side, trapped in the house even as the open French window (a floor-to-ceiling hinged window that opens onto a wrought iron railing) beckons. Finally, what is that very abstract truncated triangle of green? Often it is interpreted as ray of sun reaching across the lawn outside.
[Source: khanacademy.org}
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Piano Lesson, The1916Oil/CanvasAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Matisse, Henri1869-1954, age 95French painterFauvism
LOCATION:SIZE (cms):  
MOMA, Museum of Modern Art, 11 W 53rd St, New York, NY 10019, USA245 x 213  

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Back to 1.5.4.3.4 Picasso’s African Period
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