1.5.3.4 Abstract Art I (1880s-1952)

Forward to 1.5.3.4 Abstract Art II (1956- ) – Forward to 1.5.3.5 Divisionism (1884- )
Back to 1.5.3.3 Symbolism (1880s-1890s)
Back to 1.5.3 Pointillism Index – Back to 1.5.2 Arts and Crafts (1868-1910)

QUICK LINKS:
Windows Open Simultaneously, Delaunay
Squares with Concentric Circles, Kandinsky
Composition VII, Kandinsky
Workshop, Lewis
Hommage to Blériot, Delaunay
Blue and Green Music, O’Keeffe
Totalisateur, Picabia
On White II, Kandinsky
Red Canna, O’Keeffe
Black Iris, O’Keeffe
Composition II in Red, Blue, and Yellow, Mondrian
Ad Marginen, Klee
Rhythm, Joy of Life, Delaunay
Cow’s Skull: Red, White and Blue, O’Keeffe
Nude Woman in a red Armchair, Picasso
Composition with Red, Yellow, and Blue, Mondrian
Lobster Trap and Fish Tail, Calder
Arc of Petals (Mobile), Calder
Broadway Boogie Woogie, Mondrian
Composition, 1943, Krasner
Pasiphaë, Pollock
No, 1, 1950 (Lavender Mist), Pollock
White Center (Yellow, Pink and Lavender on Rose), Rothko
No.11, 1952 (Blue Poles), Pollock

[1534-10]


Image source: Wikimedia commons
Though Robert Delaunay had virtually discarded representational imagery by the spring of 1912 when he embarked on the Windows theme, vestigial objects endure in this series.

Here the centralized ghost of a green Eiffel Tower alludes to his enthusiasm for modern life. Analytic Cubism inspired Delaunay’s fragmentation of form, oval format, and organization of the picture’s space as a grid supporting intersecting planes. However, unlike the monochromatic, tactile planes of Cubism, those of Delaunay are not defined by line and modeling, but by the application of diaphanous, prismatic colour.
[Source: guggenheim-venice.it]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Windows Open Simultaneously (1st Part, 3rd Motif)1912Oil/CanvasAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Delaunay, Robert1885-1941, aged 56French painterAbstract
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-11]

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 5th Ave, New York, NY 10128, USA457 x 373  
Squares with Concentric Circles perhaps, Kandinsky’s most recognizable work, is not actually a full-fledged picture. This drawing is a small study on how different colour combinations are perceived that the painter used in his creative process as a support material.

For Kandinsky, colour meant more than just a visual component of a picture. Colour is its soul. In his books, he described his own perspective on how colours interacted with each other and with the spectator in detail and very poetically. Moreover, Kandinsky was a synaesthete, i.e. he could ‘hear colours’ and ‘see sounds.’

So, this is probably righteous that after a century, it is not one of his compositions – which he himself considered as his main achievements – but this small drawing that has become one of Kandinsky’s most popular works.
[Source: wassilykandinsky.net]

Image source: wassilykandinsky.net
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Squares with Concentric Circles1913Wtrclr, Gouache, Cryn/PprAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Kandinsky, Wassily1866-1944, aged 78Russian Abstract
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-12]

Stadtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus,  Luisenstraße 33, 80333 München, Germany24 x 31  

Image source: Wikimedia commons
Kandinsky’s Composition VII is justly considered to be the apex of his artwork before the First Word War. More than 30 sketches made in watercolors and oil paints precede this painting, and they can serve as ‘documentary’ proof of this work creation. Surprisingly that after the painter had finished his long preliminary work, the composition itself was created in just four days.

This can be proved by photographs taken between the 25th and the 28th of November 1913. The main theme, which is an oval form intersected by an irregular rectangle, is perceived like the centre surrounded by the vortex of colours and forms. By means of records and some works examination art historians defined that the Composition VII is a combination of several themes namely Resurrection, the Judgment Day, the Flood and the Garden of Eden. Such combination is expressed as a symbiosis of pure painting.
[Source: wassilykandinsky.net]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Composition VII1913Oil/CanvasAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Kandinsky, Wassily1866-1944, aged 78Russian Abstract
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-13]

State Tretyakov Gallery,  Lavrushinsky Ln, 10, Moscow, Russia, 119017201 x 302  
Vorticism was a short-lived but radical movement founded by Lewis in London just before the First World War, proposing an art suited to the energy of the modern world. Here, Lewis uses angles and diagonals to suggest the geometry of modern buildings. Its harsh colours and lines echo the discordant vitality of the modern city in an ‘attack on traditional harmony’.

The vorticists’ aggressive rhetoric, angular style and focus on modernity linked them to the Italian futurists. War demonstrated the devastating reality of pitting men against machines and Lewis’s attempts to revive the movement in 1919 came to nothing.
[Source: .tate.org.uk]


Image source: tate.org.uk
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Workshop1914-5Oil/CanvasAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Lewis, Wyndham1881-1957, aged 74English painterAbstract – Vorticism
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-14]

Tate Galleries, Millbank, Westminster, London SW1P 4RG UK76 x 61  

Image source: wikimedia commons
Hommage à Blériot is a work of great importance not only in Robert Delaunay’s oeuvre but in the Kunstmuseum collection as well. It unites the lyricism of a “simultaneous” palette and avant-garde motifs to create a fireworks display of intense colour.
[Source: kunstmuseumbasel.ch]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Hommage to Blériot1914Oil/CanvasAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Delaunay, Robert1885-1941, aged 56French painterAbstract
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-15]

Kunstmuseum Basel, Basel CH250 x 251  
Around 1920 Georgia O’Keeffe painted a number of oils exploring, as she later recalled, the idea that music could be translated into something for the eye.

In Blue and Green Music, O’Keeffe’s colors and forms simultaneously suggest the natural world and evoke the experience of sound. She was drawn to the theories of the Russian Expressionist painter

Vasily Kandinsky, who, in his 1912 text Concerning the Spiritual in Art, argued that visual artists should emulate music in order to achieve pure expression free of literary references.
[Source: artic.edu]

Image source: Wikimedia commons
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Blue and Green Music1919 – 1921Oil/CanvasAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
O’Keeffe, Georgia1887-1986, aged 98American artistAbstract
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-16]

 

Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago USA58 x 48  

Image source: meseoreinasofia.es
In 1922, Francis Picabia moved away from Dadaist proposals to present his new works at Barcelona’s Dalmau gallery. This was a series of very stripped-down pieces that show an innovative plastic concept based on geometry and developed from the circle.

In the historical Dalmau exhibition, alongside works with roots in Figurative art Picabia included other paintings in the Geometric Abstraction style such as Totalisateur (Totalizer), which comes from a very significant stage in the artist’s output.

Totalisateur is a perfect example of this stage when Picabia was creating very enigmatic work, focusing on machines and mechanisms, almost always with a deliberately provocative sexual symbolism. As a result of his knowledge of Freudian theory – and without overlooking the decisive influence of Duchamp’s Le grand verre (The Large Glass) on his output at the time – these mechanistic works display an obvious interest in expressing sexual procedures through a formal language taken from mechanics.
[Source: museoreinasofia.es]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Totalisateur1922Wtrclr/Ink/PprAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Picabia, Francis 1879-1963, aged 84French artistAbstract Geometric Abstraction
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-17]

Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía Calle de Santa Isabel, 52, 28012 Madrid, Spain55 x 73  
On White II, is a painting by the Russian artist Wassily Kandinsky, and was created in 1923. Kandinsky used an array of geometric shapes and lines in a colourful and riotous contemporary display, prompting many artists to imitate his style.

As the title suggests, white is predominant in this painting, including the background. Kandinsky used white to represent life, peace and silence. The majority of the geometric shapes are presented in a variety of colours, reflecting the artist’s love for the free expression of inner emotions. Striking through the kaleidoscope of shapes and colours are bold, spiked barbs in black, representing non-existence and death.

Kandinsky liked to paint while listening to music, and On White II, is his interpretation of the music, as created by his inner consciousness. The abstract and possibly mesmerising display of shapes and colours can be compared with the complexity of a musical composition.
As one of the forefathers of abstract, modern art Kandinsky used the graphic interrelation between colour, shape, and form to stimulate the mind of the viewer and open the possibility for profound transcendental expression.
[Source: kandinskypaintings.org]

Image source: wassilykandinsky.net
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
On White II1923Oil/CanvasAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Kandinsky, Wassily1866-1944, aged 78Russian Abstract
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-18]

Georges Pompidou Centre, Place Georges-Pompidou, 75004 Paris, France105 x 98  

Image source: Wikimedia commons
Georgia O’Keeffe made a number of Red Canna paintings of the canna lily plant, first in watercolour, such as a red canna flower bouquet painted in 1915, but primarily abstract paintings of close-up images in oil.

O’Keeffe said that she made the paintings to reflect the way she herself saw flowers, although others have called her depictions erotic, and compared them to female genitalia.
[Source: Wikimedia commons]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Red Canna1923Oil/CanvasAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
O’Keeffe, Georgia1887-1986, aged 98American artistAbstract
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-19]

Various locations30 x 25  
The iris is a familiar image in Western art, frequently used in Christian iconography; its swordlike leaves were especially employed as a symbol for Mary’s suffering, a pictorial metaphor which might also have been familiar to O’Keeffe from her Catholic upbringing and her parochial schooling.

O’Keeffe’s famous irises were an important preoccupation for many years; she favored the black iris, which she could only find at certain New York florists for about two weeks each spring.

Unlike Impressionist’s flower painting, such as Irises by Vincent van Gogh, O’Keeffe’s enlargements and abstractions derived from the flower have often been explained in gynecological terms, almost clinical in their precision.
[Source: georgiaokeeffe.net]

Image source: Wikimedia commons
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Black Iris1926Oil/CanvasAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
O’Keeffe, Georgia1887-1986, aged 98American artistAbstract
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-20]

MOMA, Museum of Modern Art, 1 W 53rd St, New York, NY 10019, USA91 x 76  

Image source: Wikimedia commons
Around 1930 Mondrian’s art attained a highpoint of purity and sobriety, for which the groundwork had been prepared in the paintings of the previous years, the 1929 Composition, for example. Actually, the Composition II in Red, Blue, and Yellow, 1930 is a variation on the picture of the preceding year, at least in so far as the linear framework is concerned.

But for that very reason the subtle differences in the work – such as the subdivision of the left strip of the painting into three unequal rectangles, one of which is the blue square – are all the more remarkable. They show that there can never be any question in Mondrian of a preconceived pattern for a composition, but that every work arises out of cautious and painstaking association with the elements of painting, which must be resolved anew in every work.

Especially noteworthy in this work is the large red square in the upper right corner which, like the white square in the painting of the previous year, is bounded by only two lines within the painting and thus has a tendency to grow further, in rhythmic expansion, beyond the edge of the canvas.
[Source: piet-mondrian.org]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Composition II in Red, Blue, and Yellow1930Oil/CanvasAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Mondrian, Piet1872 – 1944, aged 71DutchAbstract
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-21]

Kunsthaus Zürich, Heimplatz 1, 8001 Zürich, Switzerland60 x 60  
Known for his unique pictorial language and innovative teachings at the Bauhaus, Paul Klee had far-reaching influence on 20th-century modernism.

In an early attempt to master colour, he associated himself with the group Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider), working closely with friend and future Bauhaus colleague Wassily Kandinsky.

While engaged with artistic theory, Klee also admired children’s art, wanting his own style to be similarly unaffected. And his dream-like pictures made him popular with the Surrealists, though he never officially became one.
[Source: artsy.net]

Image source: paulklee.net
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Ad Marginen – to the brim1930Oil/CanvasAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Klee, Paul1879 – 1940, aged 60Swiss-German artistAbstract
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-22]

Kuntsmuseum Basel, St. Alban-Graben 16, 4051 Basel, Switzerland60 x 80  

Image source: Wikimedia commons
Inspired by 19th century theories about the perception and psychology of color, French artist Robert Delaunay created his own art movement, called Simultanéisme.

Simultaneity, in Delauney’s view, meant that color could take a form of its own, affecting the spatial dimension of a composition and the perception of movement within it.  

One of his biggest admirers, Guillaume Apollinaire, gave the movement the more poetic name of Orphism – from Orpheus, the Greek god of music.

Greatly influenced by Neo-Impresisonism, Cubism and Futurism in the first part of his career, by the 1930s the artist’s work became completely abstract and devoted to color as its main subject. Rhythm, Joy of Life (Rhythme, Joie de Vivre) is an abstract artwork that uses bold colors to reflect the joy of living, the exhuberance and harmony that Delaunay experienced while painting.
[Source: artschaft.com]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Rhythm, Joy of Life (Rhythme, Joie de Vivre)1930-1Oil/CanvasAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Delaunay, Robert1885-1941, aged 56French painterAbstract
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-23]

Private collection204 x 180  
Weary of life in the metropolis, O’Keeffe began taking regular retreats to Lake George, New York, and then to New Mexico.

After her first extended trip to the Southwest in 1929, her artistic interests shifted from the buildings of New York to the nature of New Mexico. In this work, O’Keeffe isolates a single skull, highlighting its jagged edges, worn surfaces, and bleached color.

To O’Keeffe, such bones represented the desert’s enduring beauty and the strength of the American spirit, which is alluded to in the striped background. In 1949 O’Keeffe settled permanently in New Mexico, where she lived until her death in 1986.
[Source: metmuseum.org]

Image source: Wikimedia commons
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Cow’s Skull: Red, White and Blue1931Oil/CanvasAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
O’Keeffe, Georgia1887-1986, aged 98American artistAbstract
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-24]

Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY USA101 x 91  

Image source: tate.org.uk
 This work belongs to the remarkable sequence of portraits that Picasso made of Marie-Thérèse Walter at his country property at Boisgeloup. Marie-Thérèse is presented here – as in most of her portraits – as a series of sensuous curves. Even the scrolling arms of the chair have been heightened and exaggerated to echo the rounded forms of her body. The face is a double or metamorphic image: the right side can also be seen as the face of a lover in profile, kissing her on the lips.
[Source: tate.org.uk]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Nude Woman in a Red Armchair1932Oil/CanvasAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Picasso, Pablo1881 – 1973, aged 91Spanish painterAbstract
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-25]

Tate Galleries, Millbank, Westminster, London SW1P 4RG UK130 x 98  
Walking up to Piet Mondrian’s painting, Composition with Red, Blue, and Yellow can be a baffling experience (see image above). The canvas is small and uses only the simplest of colors: red, blue, yellow, white and black. The composition is similarly reduced to the simplest of rectilinear forms, squares and rectangles defined by vertical and horizontal lines. One would hardly suspect that we are seeing the artist’s determination to depict the underlying structure of reality.

Mondrian called his style Neo-Plasticism or ‘The New Plastic Painting’, the title of his famous 1917 essay promoting abstraction for the expression of modern life.

Don’t be confused by Mondrian’s use of the term ‘plastic’. He uses it to refer to the plastic arts media such as sculpture, that moulds three-dimensional form, or, in Mondrian’s case, painting on canvas.
[Source: khanacademy.org]

Image source: piet-mondrian.org
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Composition with Red, Yellow, and Blue1937-1942Oil/CanvasAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Mondrian, Piet1872 – 1944, aged 71DutchAbstract
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-26]

Kunsthaus Zürich, Heimplatz 1, 8001 Zürich, Switzerland46 x 46  

Image source: moma.org
Lobster Trap and Fish Tail, a mobile by American artist Alexander Calder. It is one of Calder’s earliest hanging mobiles and the first to reveal the basic characteristics of the genre that launched his enormous international reputation and popularity.
[Source: Wikimedia commons]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Lobster Trap and Fish Tail1939Sheet Mtl/WireSculpture
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Calder, Alexander1898-1976, aged 78American sculptorAbstract/Kinetic
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-27]

MOMA, Museum of Modern Art, 1 W 53rd St, New York, NY 10019, USA260 x 290  
During the early 1930s Alexander Calder, a pioneering figure in the development of kinetic art, created sculptures in which balanced components move, some driven by motor and others impelled by the action of air currents.

Marcel Duchamp first applied the descriptive designation ‘mobiles’ to those reliant on air alone. Either suspended or freestanding, these constructions generally consist of flat pieces of painted metal connected by wire veins and stems. Their biomorphic shapes recall the organic motifs of the Surrealist painting and sculpture of his friends Joan Miró and Jean Arp.

Calder, a fastidious craftsman, cut, bent, punctured, and twisted his materials entirely by hand, the manual emphasis contributing to the sculptures’ evocation of natural form. Shape, size, colour, space, and movement combine and recombine in shifting, balanced relationships that provide a visual equivalent to the harmonious but unpredictable activity of nature.
[Source: guggenheim.org]

Image source: pinterest.com
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Arc of Petals (Mobile)1941Aluminium/
Wire
Sculpture
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Calder, Alexander1898-1976, aged 78American sculptorAbstract/Kinetic
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-28]

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 5th Ave, New York, NY 10128, USA240 x 220 x 90  

Image source: moma.org
Mondrian arrived in New York in 1940, one of the many European artists who moved to the United States to escape World War II.

He immediately fell in love with the city and with boogie-woogie music, to which he was introduced on his first evening in New York. Soon he began, as he said, to put a little boogie-woogie into his paintings.

Mondrian’s aesthetic doctrine of Neo-Plasticism restricted the painter to the most basic kinds of line—that is, to straight horizontals and verticals—and to a similarly limited color range, the primary triad of red, yellow, and blue plus white, black, and the grays in between. But Broadway Boogie Woogie omits black and breaks Mondrian’s once uniform bars of color into multicolored segments. Bouncing against each other, these tiny, blinking blocks of color create a vital and pulsing rhythm, an optical vibration that jumps from intersection to intersection like traffic on the streets of New York. At the same time, the picture is carefully calibrated, its colors interspersed with gray and white blocks.
[Source: moma.org]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Broadway Boogie Woogie1942-3Oil/CanvasAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Mondrian, Piet1872 – 1944, aged 71DutchAbstract
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-29]

MOMA, Museum of Modern Art, 11 W 53rd St, New York, NY 10019, USA127 x 127  
In 1940, Lee Krasner joined the American Abstract Artists, a group that promoted international ideas on abstraction and non-objective art. Composition shows the powerful impact of European modernists Piet Mondrian and Pablo Picasso on her work.

At this point in her career, Krasner often combined nature and abstraction in the form of a still-life. She did not sign Composition at first, though her signature was later added, possibly by her husband, Jackson Pollock, who signed other works.

Pollock insisted she sign her paintings despite Krasner’s protests that European artists, such as Mondrian, did not. She later scraped down many of her works from this period to be used for future paintings.
[Source: americanart.si.edu]

Image source: pinterest.co.uk
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Composition, 19431943Oil/CanvasAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Krasner, Lee1908 – 1984, aged 76American painterAbstract
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-30]

Smithsonian Institute,  600 Maryland Ave SW, Washington, DC 20002, USA76 x 62  

Image source: metmuseum.org
Pasiphaë confronts the viewer with a maelstrom of swirling and angular lines and broken forms, all pressed up to the front of the picture plane, an allover effect later seen in Pollock’s ‘drip’ canvases.

The painter developed this novel interpretation of the Surrealist technique of automatism (which taps the artist’s unconscious to compose the image) by creating dozens of coloured drawings. Amid the chaos are barely discernible sentinel-like forms on both sides of a prostrate figure in the center.

Pollock originally called this painting Moby Dick, but he retitled it after hearing the story of the Cretan princess Pasiphaë, who gave birth to the half-man, half-bull Minotaur. Throughout World War II, many artists mined classical mythology’s vast repository of tragic tales of war, struggle, and loss.
[Source: metmuseum.org]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
Pasiphaë1943Oil/CanvasAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Pollock, Jackson1912-1956, Aged 44AmericanAbstract
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-31]

Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY USA143 x 244  

Image source: jackson-pollock.org
Jackson Pollock’s mural-size ‘drip’ paintings met with mixed reactions when they debuted at the Betty Parsons Gallery in New York City in 1948.

Sales were dismal, and critical reviews offered skepticism or mild appreciation. Yet only one year later, a Life magazine article featured Pollock, arms crossed and cigarette dangling from his lips, standing in front of one of his swirled, caffeinated images.

The caption under the photograph asked, Is he the greatest living painter in the United States?
[Source: nga.gov]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
No, 1, 1950 (Lavender Mist)1950Oil/En/CnvAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Pollock, Jackson1912-1956, Aged 44AmericanAbstract
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-32]

National Gallery of Art, Washington DC USA221 x 300  
White Center (Yellow, Pink and Lavender on Rose) is an abstract painting by Mark Rothko completed in 1950. The work was sold in May 2007 by Sotheby’s on behalf of David Rockefeller to the Royal family of Qatar; Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al-Thani, and his wife, Mozah bint Nasser Al Missned. The painting sold for 72.8m US$, then setting the record of the current most expensive post-war work of art sold at auction.
[Source: Wikimedia commons]

Image source: Wikimedia commons
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
White Center (Yellow, Pink and Lavender on Rose)1950Abstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Rothko, Mark1903-1970, aged 66Russian-AmericanAbstract
LOCATION:SIZE (cms): [1534-33]

Royal Family of Qatar206 x 141  

Image source: Wikimedia commons
Blue Poles, originally titled Number 11, 1952, is an abstract expressionist painting and one of the most famous works by Jackson Pollock. It was purchased by the National Gallery of Australia in 1973 and today remains one of the gallery’s major holdings.

At the time of the painting’s creation, Pollock preferred not to assign names to his works, but rather numbers. In 1954, the new title Blue Poles was first seen at an exhibition at the Sidney Janis Gallery and reportedly originated from Pollock himself.

According to art historian Dennis Phillips, the specific rather than ambiguous title limits our field of comprehension and does the painting a singular disservice. Because we look for the poles and miss much of the rest, the name is simply too distracting.
[Source: jackson-pollock.org]
TITLE:YEAR:FORM:GENRE:
No.11, 1952 (Blue Poles)1952OilAbstract
ARTIST:DATES:ORIGIN:MOVEMENT:
Pollock, Jackson1912-1956, Aged 44AmericanAbstract
LOCATION:SIZE (cms):  
National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Australia210 x 486  

Forward to 1.5.3.4 Abstract Art II (1956- ) – Forward to 1.5.3.5 Divisionism (1884- )
Back to 1.5.3.3 Symbolism (1880s-1890s)
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